Friday, 16 January 2015

Pigeonhole Books


I was recently interviewed by Pigeonhole Books. It creates children’s books for 21st families. The stereotypical nuclear family is no longer necessarily the norm and the aim of these books is to introduce the different kinds of families that are becoming more and more common-place with a view to informing and breaking down barriers.

It is also seeking to create a resource for readers in search of bloggers who write about modern-day parenting  and features blogs that hone in on parenting after divorce, step parenting, co-parenting, same-sex parenting, blended families and multicultural/interracial families.

Its website may only be new but already it is well worth a visit.


Tuesday, 13 January 2015

The Rat Pack



Last week contractors undertook work to the field drains next door to us. In so doing they presumably disturbed the rats which must nest there, as this week the greenhouse at the bottom of our garden has been visited.

This in turn has given rise to a challenge for Outdoor Man to rid our premises of the rodents.

It was in language reminiscent of a description of the perpetrator of domestic violence that he referred to the stinking rats and vermin as he sought my opinion.

I had to confess that I did not think that the expertise I had acquired in obtaining ouster orders during my practising years would assist to any extent. It seems, however, that he was not considering an injunction and really wanted my view on the different types of rat poison.

Why ever would he think that a retired divorce solicitor would be an expert on toxic substances?


Sunday, 11 January 2015

The Sugar Plantation



Once upon a time, I recall a client referring to her husband’s behaviour towards her with the immortal words, “It ain’t no sugar rush when he rings.”

She was describing how he constantly monitored her movements using smartphone technology and repeatedly ringing her to make it clear that he knew where she was and required an account of what she was doing.

On our recent journey through Cuba, we visited the buildings on an old sugar plantation. There was a luxurious hacienda down the lane from a large foreboding bell-tower. The tower had been used to better watch the slaves working in the fields and the huge bell which hung from the top was rung to control their day.

Whilst  slavery in the plantations has long since been abolished, many the marriage that breaks up because one spouse feels that the other controls their every move. The bell at the top of the tower may no longer be rung, but for some it has simply been replaced by the ringing of a mobile phone